EU Greenhouse Gas Levels Lower Than 90s

THE LATEST figures from the European Environment Agency (EEA) show EU greenhouse gas emissions in 2011 were 18.4% lower than 1990 levels.

The 2011 emissions decrease was largely due to a milder winter in 2011 compared to 2010, which led to a lower demand for heating.

However, it was also down to action from the UK, France and Germany who contributed almost two thirds of the emissions reduction.

The largest increases in the absolute volume of emissions were from Romania, Bulgaria and Spain.

Jacqueline McGlade, EEA Executive Director, said: “The greenhouse gas emissions cut in 2011 is good news, however, it was largely due to a warmer winter. Nonetheless, the EU is making clear progress towards its emission targets.”

She continued: “There was an increase in consumption of more carbon-intensive fuels such as coal, while hydroelectricity production and gas consumption decreased. If Europe is to achieve the transition towards a low-carbon society, it will need sustained investment in technology and innovation.”

Energy in the EU coming from wind and solar continued to increase strongly and fossil fuel consumption decreased by 5 %.

However, the average carbon intensity of the fossil fuels used increased, with solid fuel consumption, such as hard coal and lignite, rising by almost 2 % between 2010 and 2011.

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